Writing Every Day

Normally, I don’t make New Year’s resolutions, or at least I don’t strictly hold myself to resolutions I make at parties or around the dinner table on New Year’s Eve. At the very least, I usually resolve to write more often. Often, that doesn’t happen.

For the first eight months of 2014, I was still in film school and got a lot of writing done—feature screenplays, a TV spec, short scripts—because it was assigned and therefore had built-in deadlines.

At the end of that year, I moved back to Wisconsin. When 2015 hit, I got two jobs and poured most of my energy into balancing them. Yes, I still made time to network and work on a handful of film projects, and yes, I wrote from time to time.

Ultimately, though, as I looked back on the year in December, I realized that I had spent a lot of time not writing. Instead, I wasted time and made excuses.

I worked both jobs today.

My friends want to hang out.

I’m going to a film festival.

It’s ten p.m. and I just got off work.

I’d rather spend time on facebook before work.

Et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.

It’s easy to make excuses. I looked at all the time I spent on social media, or complaining about how I never had time to write, or doing anything instead of sitting down for 30 minutes before I left for work or after I got home and writing a few sentences, and I realized that I had plenty of time to write. And despite my busy work schedule, I had that time every day.

So as 2015 drew to a close, I quietly resolved to write every day.

Over five months later, I haven’t missed a single day.

I don’t hold myself to a certain word or page limit each day. With my current schedule, that would be very hard to achieve some days. But I write something every day. Some days, it is one sentence. Some days, it’s a little revising work. Some days, it’s several pages. Most days, it’s something in between.

I hold myself accountable by keeping a writing log on my computer. All I keep track of is what project(s) I worked on each day. I still have days where I feel tired, or work a lot, or get distracted by social media for hours. I still make myself write on those days.

I have wondered if something will happen that will trip me up, or if a day will come when I find an excuse to skip writing. For example, in March, I directed a short film that shot for two days. I wondered if I should allow myself to skip writing because I was directing a film that I had written. Does doing something creative that is not writing allow me to take a break from writing? Not this year. In the future, it may. The truth is, on the days that I was on set for 12 hours, I still felt compelled to write something after I got home. So I did.

I didn’t write this blog post to brag, but to simply say that if you want to do something creative, you can work toward it every day if you put your mind to it, and, most importantly, if you hold yourself accountable.

Last year, I would tell people that I was “working on” several projects. What I meant was that I had several projects that I had started but not finished. I hadn’t touched most of those projects in months.

This year, I am literally working on several projects. I have some features in the works, as well as short films and a web series. I’m collaborating on a project with another screenwriter. I revised a feature film that I started in film school and sent it to the PAGE Awards screenwriting competition. I have written countless pages.

Most importantly, despite getting distracted from time to time, I don’t want to stop writing.

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What am I Doing with my Life?

I graduated from film school six months ago. So what have I been doing since then? Not much blogging, obviously.

I spent the first three months wandering around Vancouver, applying for jobs here and there, and writing when the mood struck me. This sounds boring, but it was actually pretty fun, considering I could see movies or hang out with my friends whenever I wanted to. We even had a couple of writing workshops, which was fun in addition to being useful.

After failing to secure a work permit (which is nearly impossible for Americans who graduate from VFS) I moved back home to good old Wisconsin at the end of November. The worst part was going from Vancouver’s tropical-seeming 30-degree fall to Wisconsin’s freezing dead of winter. But the weather wasn’t that hard to get used to since I’m a native and because it’s colder here, so we have better methods of staying warm: wool, fires, down-filled comforters.

I spent the first few weeks home reading and going to yoga classes. I also started making some film connections here, thanks in part to my cousin, Tony. I even made these nifty business cards!

Here's my card

Here’s my card

I’ve been reconnecting with old friends, which has been really nice. It’s so interesting to see someone after a number of years and notice how both of us have changed, yet we still have things in common.

I have also been writing, of course, though not as much as I’d like to. I’m working on a number of scripts at the moment, and in January I started writing articles for my friend Mike’s website, Geek Happy Network.

I got a part-time job selling tea a couple of weeks ago, and so far that’s been going really well. And in March, I’m going to start teaching yoga at a new studio in Prairie du Sac. I’m so excited!

Other than that, I’ve been seeing a lot of movies (gotta keep up on what’s out there) and getting ready to promote my short film “Smile, Baby.” A Madison production company, Frozen Stage Films, is going to host a screening of the film on March 15 at 2pm at the High Noon Saloon. After that, my lovely producer Amanda and I will be sending “Smile, Baby” out to film festivals. I’ll share more details as soon as I have them!

I’m also working on another short film that I’m going to make this year. I have a full script that I’ve rewritten several times, and I also have an actor who’s interested in being a part of it. So the next step is getting crew on board. I’ll share more details soon on that front as well.

So in conclusion, despite the cold and the snow, I’m doing things. And it feels good.

2014

Ah, the obligatory “looking back on the past year” post. On December 31, of all days.

In all seriousness, 2014 was an amazing year.

I spent most of the year at VFS, writing all kinds of projects. I saw my writing produced on two occasions–two episodes of a web series that I co-wrote with Dan Christensen came to life through the Film Production program, and I directed my short script “Smile, Baby.” And, in case you missed it in the last sentence, I directed for the first time! I also learned to produce through a new part of the VFS writing program, and with my team–Connor, Sarah-Jane, Michael, and Sasha–brought Sarah-Jane’s script Infect Me Not to life.

2014 was the year I got an IMDb profile.

I solidified a number of great friendships with my classmates in 2014. I met and worked with some very talented people.

This year, I wrote more than I’ve ever written before. I made my first film, and I helped to make several others. I submitted my feature screenplay and had at least one producer read it. He decided not to option it, but said it was “well-crafted.” I’ll take that!

2014 was the year I graduated from film school.

I gained confidence through these experiences. I know I can write a feature screenplay and finish it in a timely manner. I know all the work that goes into making a short film. I know that I can network and be smooth when I need to be. I have faith that my ideas are good. I know that I will write and make films wherever I go.

Happy New Year!